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Old September 4th, 2005, 10:19 AM
Rebecca502 Rebecca502 is offline
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Which should you choose first- aperture or shutter speed? Also what shutter speed should I use for....

Which should you choose first- aperture or shutter speed?

Also what shutter speed should I be using? -I plan on taking pictures around the neighborhood/backyard. It's 200 (spd?) b&w film, and the instructor said to stay between 60 and 200 shutter speed, but I have no idea which to pick.
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:09 AM
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dave13 dave13 is offline
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What type of camera is it? Does it have an Aperture priority mode(Av mode on Canon)? Or a shutter priority ( Tv mode on Canon)

60 is going to be 1/60 of a second. Are you sure it was 200? I'm guessing that it is 250, or 1/250 of a second.

On many auto cameras, if you select the shutter speed, the built in meter will select an appropriate aperture. Vice versa, if you select the aperture to control the depth of field, the camera will select the correct shutter speed.

As to which you pick first, thats up to you as to what you want to portray artistically. There really is no right or wrong for a landscape. Shutter speed is crucial in motion/action shots.

Did your instructor give you any other instructions?

Are you supposed to do a scenic picture showing the relation of near and far? Then you would want a smaller aperture (larger f/ like say f/16 or f/22) Is it supposed to show selective focus, where your subject is in sharp focus while the background is out of focus? The you would want a larger aperture ( smaller f/ like f/4 or f/5.6)

Just remember that photos of backyards can be really busy and draw the eye in too many directions. If you can, remove any clutter from the frame. Toys, furniture, garbage cans, etc.

I'd also suggest a tripod to help insure a sharper image just by reducing camera shake. Good luck
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:21 AM
Rebecca502 Rebecca502 is offline
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Hi, thanks for the reply. Well this is just our first project and we're doing bracketing to get used to our cameras. There are no specific instructions of what to shoot, just that it has to be outside. I mean that the type of film is 200, but he did say to keep the shutter speed between 60 and 200 (I wrote it down). I just would like to know what's a good general shutter speed to keep it at.

-And the camera is a Canon Rebel K2
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:30 AM
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dave13 dave13 is offline
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I understand the 200 ISO film speed. Seriously, I'd double check about the 200 shutter speed though, I can't even get my camera to 200, it's 125, 180, 250. But anyways, just go out on a really sunny day, set it to f/16 and 1/250 and shoot away
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:31 AM
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capt*tast capt*tast is offline
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On a sunny day, the shutter speed woud be equal to the film speed. so 1/200 of a second with ASA 200. This is at a Aperature of f/16 and is known as the Sunny 16 rule. Assuming the aperature is below that (meaning more open) you could speed up your shutter speed.

Ps. I could be completely wrong on this, but I think
I'm pretty close.
Pros- help me out.
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Stop reading and go shoot, shoot and shoot some more.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:37 AM
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dave13 dave13 is offline
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Quoting " Example when using ASA 100 speed film. For a sunny day picture, set the shutter to 1/100 of a sec or as close as possibly i.e. 1/125. And the aperture to f/16 this will be the correct exposure " Sunny 16". "

http://www.davidrichert.com/sunny_16_rule.htm

So I'm assuming for 200 ISO film it would be 1/200 and since there is no 1/200 it would be 1/250
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:41 AM
Rebecca502 Rebecca502 is offline
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Thanks for the replies!

So... it's actually kind of overcast today, but I want to go out and shoot the neighborhood what would be a good shutter speed/aperture to start?
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:47 AM
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dave13 dave13 is offline
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You're welcome . take a look at that link I posted. But for overcast open 3 stops, in this case f/5.6.

If youre camera has auto modes, just put it on the landscape mode.
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:50 AM
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capt*tast capt*tast is offline
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Bronze Commitment Award: This award is given to those who have shown great community dedication & commitment and have over 1,000 posts. - Issue reason
That depends....
1. Read the article in the resource section on exposure.
The less light that enters the lens, the more you will have to decrease your shutter speed and/or open your aperture.
If it's overcast, assuming you left the aperture the same, you would have to use a slower shutter speed to compensate for less light.
__________________
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Stop reading and go shoot, shoot and shoot some more.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.
-Robert Frost
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Old September 4th, 2005, 11:52 AM
Rebecca502 Rebecca502 is offline
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Ok thanks!
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