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Old June 8th, 2007, 12:37 PM
scottydog scottydog is offline
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flash gun or strobes

Hi i recently have been doing some outside portraits and due to the weather have got to do some indoors,do you think i would be best using a flash gun with a diffuser (lightsphere etc) or buying 2 strobes ?.When i say best i mean which would give me best results.I dont really wish to carry strobes to others house;s but if i get the shots then so be it.
Does anyone have any shots to show which have been taken with either strobes or flashguns for me to compare ?
thanks
scott.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 01:16 PM
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bcphoto bcphoto is offline
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When done right, one shouldn't be able to tell whether the light was from a strobe or flash gun(battery pack system/on camera flash system--I'm guessing that these are what you mean.) There are pros and cons to both systems. a battery pack system is usually more expensive, and bulkier, but almost always offers more power, light modifying accessories for control, and durability. The on camera flash systems are less expensive and easily packed with camera equipment, but usually have less power and lower GN, and have limited modifier choices.

I use a Canon 580EX on and off camera, with and without modifiers(most often a 4'X4' diffusion panel) and it does just fine for most portrait shoots. On some shoots, I wish that I had just a bit more power flexability, but not often enough for me to invest in a battery pack flash system.

Light is light, in this case. You'll be able to achieve same to similar results with either system, with knowledge of capabilities and limitations of the systems and proper use and modification of light.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 04:27 PM
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ohenry ohenry is offline
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I use 2 Canon 580's mounted on lightstands, a ST-E2 to trigger them, umbrellas and reflectors in lieu of buying strobes. Nice monolights would be nice, but I don't do enough portraiture to warrant the expense. But having 2 flashes gives me flexibility, portability, and options. I can shoot on camera or off, 1 or 2 flashes, indoors or outdoors, control the lighting ratio, diffuse, reflect, soften, harden, whatever.

Not taking anything away from strobes, as they are quite nice to own, but unless you're doing a lot of work that calls for this type of lighting, flashes will do a lot and more. Moving strobes around for location shots is not nearly as flexible. So, I give up power for flexibility.

If you do a lot of indoor portraiture, studio strobes will pay for themselves. If you do more outdoor portraiture, flashes will likely find their way into your bag more often than will studio lights, power pack, etc.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 08:27 PM
scottydog scottydog is offline
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Thanks for the replys ,what you say makes lots of sense ! i never thought of using 2 flash guns,do you know if you can use the older canon ez flashguns on my 350d(trigger voltage) as they are much cheaper than the newer ex models ?
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Old June 10th, 2007, 08:47 PM
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I don't think you can use the EZ models on your camera.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 11:24 PM
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I don't see why you couldn't. The 540EZ does have older TTL technology and I'm uncertain if the TTL metering will even work with the 350d. But I don't fully trust any of the TTL technology, since none of my personal TTL tests resulted in accurate exposure, anyway. If your shooting pace allows for manual flash settings and meter readings, then yes, opt for the less expensive 540EZs. If your shooting is fast paced and you wish to not deal with manual settings, opt for the auto option of the newer EX models.
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