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Old June 17th, 2005, 08:35 AM
yourtexasrose yourtexasrose is offline
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Newbie needs advice on buying a camera

I'm just starting out in photography, and I'm reading articles, books and looking at photos and such, but I don't have a camera! My dad has a Minolta X700 with an auto-focus lens that's probably over twenty years old, but he says that it works great. I'm not sure if he'll give it or sell it to me, but I'm thinking that might be a good option if it's a good camera.

Overall, I want something not too expensive since I'm just starting out and I'm a poor college student (just spent $7000 on a new flute... yikes!), but I want something nicer than your average everyday camera that you take on vacation or keg parties (not that I go to keg parties! lol).

I'm also debating whether I should go 35mm or digital. The problem with digital is that I know nothing about Photoshop (although I could learn) and I don't have a good printer (something I'm not sure if I want to invest in yet).

Can y'all help me out? :)
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Old June 17th, 2005, 03:41 PM
mi_july mi_july is offline
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As a beginner I would suggest film, knowing that you only have 36shots (in the case of 35mm) you think more about your composition, which develops you're eye for a shot. However digital in the long run is much cheaper but the initial investment in a dgital slr can be daunting and it wont be as future proofed. so film has my vote and a good second hand manual slr is what id say!
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Old June 17th, 2005, 03:54 PM
snapshot snapshot is offline
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It is always better to learn photography with an all manual camera especially if you are a beginner but there is nothing wrong with using your father's camera. Learn and understand all what photography is about, take as many photos as you can, follow the rules then learn how to break them, develop your own style of photography, and once you have thoroughly accomplished all that then I'd say go digital. Why? because you will already have a thorough understanding of photography and what your style is. Digital is another part in the entire world of photography and what better way to approach it than with a thorough understanding of what photography is all about! Good luck.

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Old June 17th, 2005, 04:05 PM
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texaviator23 texaviator23 is offline
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I agree with the two previous, I started with a Minolta 35mm and shots hundreds of rolls of film, I just now bought my first digital after 3 years in film so im still a newbie. It makes you think a little more on setup and all where as here in the digital relm you get the instant results. If you do go digital get a manual one where you can learn the art form of settings and light. You can get a nice manual digital camera for around 600 bucks, as usual I have to pitch my Minolta A200 and you can see on my web site that it serves as a good all around shooter.
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Old June 17th, 2005, 04:23 PM
kb244 kb244 is offline
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Hrm or you can pay 600$ towards a Canon Digital Rebel, and force yourself to put it in M mode.
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Old June 17th, 2005, 04:33 PM
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boukaluv boukaluv is offline
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well everyone has there opinion. I think film is best to start out with. It trains your eye. Whic every good photographer has. besides digital quality only is increasing. By the time you are ready to buy one the pixel count will be better. Thats what im doing anyhow. What kind of photos are you interested in. That is also something oyu should think about when deciding on digital or film.
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Old June 17th, 2005, 05:15 PM
yourtexasrose yourtexasrose is offline
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Thanks for the help so far, y'all. :)

And in reply to boukaluv, my backyard is the Smokey Mountains. The nearest mountain is a mere 10-15 minutes away. So I definitely would love to do some nature shots (I think it'd be crazy of me if I didn't!). I'm also interested in urban settings as well. To be honest, I could see myself snapping pictures of anything that screams at me.

I think that a 35mm would be a wise investment, also. It will give me good practice with aiming and shooting.

Any brands or series y'all recommend?
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Old June 17th, 2005, 05:23 PM
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Cleo Cleo is offline
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I think film is best to start out with. It trains your eye.
Can you explain that to me? Seriously, I do not understand that statement. Are you attempting to say that you are more careful with film then digital on the amount of photos taken? I don't see how you can train your eye by using film over digital, makes no sense. The only way you can train your eye is to mimic & study photos that other masters have taken, and even then you aren't training your eye. When a photographer has a good eye, it is a gift. Sort of like an excellent storyteller or a painter or a woodworker. A master of an art is just that, a master of the craft. You can learn technicals, you can learn what a good picture is, you can learn composition and style and you can even learn how to capture an amazing photograph, but I seriously doubt you can train your eye.

Ok, sorry for derailing the thread, now back to business...

Buy either. Buy what you want. If you want digital then buy digital & leave it in the MANUAL mode. If you want a film camera buy one. The choice is truly yours, both are wonderful.

As far as waiting for the last stopping point with digital, that just ain't gonna happen. Digital photography will march on just like computers.
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Old June 18th, 2005, 01:56 AM
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kixphotography kixphotography is offline
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There are some slr-type and even some point and shoots that have manual mode as well (digital cameras that is). These may be good to have and start off with.
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Old June 18th, 2005, 10:05 AM
snapshot snapshot is offline
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if interested you can get a canon digital rebel for less than $600.

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